6. Prozac Monologues: September 2018

Saturday, September 8, 2018

Bipolar and Mitochondria

Misfirings and mis-timings of a number of systems affecting: hormones, neurotransmitters, and immune system cycles that go off-kilter; glitches in communication between brain cells and within brain cells; and wonky wiring among the networks that connect the thinking, feeling, and evaluating parts of the brain -- that's bipolar disorder in a nutshell.  Okay, a very full nutshell.  Last week I explored one example of hormone cycles gone off-kilter, cortisol.

This week, we go inside cells to discuss my favorite little critters, mitochondria.  I first learned about mitochondria from Madeleine L'Engle, from the second of her Wrinkle in Time series, A Wind in the Door.  Charles Wallace is sick, dying, because of a problem inside his cells.  His mitochondria are not doing their job.

Mitochondria are organisms (technically, organelles) that crawled inside the cells of animals back when animals were being formed out of the ooze.  It is a beautiful relationship.  We are their hosts and meal ticket; they are the power plants that convert food into energy.  If they don't work well, neither do we.  Since the brain uses bucket loads of energy, a problem with energy production has serious consequences for anything the brain is supposed to do.

What Do Mitochondria Do?

Saturday, September 1, 2018

Bipolar and Cortisol

Y'all know about Bipolar as the mood disorder of Up and Down.  You have seen the movies, watched the soap operas and dramas.  The medications promise to reduce the number of trips around the loop de loop.

That's important, because what goes up must come down, and the fall can be mighty.  But there is more to is that that.

In a person with bipolar, a whole series of mis-timings and misalignments in our internal and external cycles results in a failure to maintain balance.  The list includes: dysregulation of hormones, neurotransmitters, and immune system; irregularities in communication between brain cells and within brain cells; and wonky wiring among the networks that connect the thinking, feeling, and evaluating parts of the brain.

In other words,


Over the next few weeks, I will sample this list, especially the items that are true all the time, even when not on that roller coaster.

Dysregulation of cortisol is one of my favorites, to use the term loosely.  Cortisol is the get-up-and-go hormone.  It gets you out of bed in the morning and manages energy throughout the day in response to stress.