6. Prozac Monologues: April 2009

Sunday, April 12, 2009

I Am Not SAD

What month has the highest rate of suicides in the northern hemisphere?  What about the lowest? You will find the answer at the end of this post. 

Seasonal Affective Disorder

Some people get depressed in the winter.  Along about October or November, they start to feel lethargic.  They want to sleep a lot.  They crave carbs and gain weight.  They may lose interest in their normal activities, not want to see people, feel hopeless, think about death.  The deeper the winter, the sadder they feel.  In April, they start to feel better, regain their energy, and even feel giddy by the time May comes round.  It happens almost every year.

This is a specific kind of Major Depressive Disorder called SAD, Seasonal Affective Disorder.  It is no fun.

Sunday, April 5, 2009

In The Beginning

In the beginning I went to my doctor for a med check. I had been on Prozac for three months. I was anxious and agitated, irritable, couldn't concentrate and couldn't sleep. I thought I needed a higher dose.

I was wrong. 

As I walked in the door, I had a thought. It was more intrusive than a fantasy, and less welcome. Never mind for now what it was, but it involved a nail file... I didn't tell my doctor about this thought. I just got my higher dose.

That is when things started to get really bizarre. 

The Birth Of Prozac Monologues 

A short while later, while coming off Prozac, I tried to imagine how I could tell people about what it was like to have to come off Prozac. The only medium that seemed appropriate was the stand-up comedy routine.

And that was the birth of Prozac Monologues, with its first chapter, Bizarre.

Someday, Prozac Monologues will be available to the purchasing public. For now, come here to find out about depression and its treatment, drugs and research, the brain and its wonders.

Welcome -- Willa


photo modified from original by Tom Varco

reformatted 11/26/10