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Showing posts from November, 2010

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy -- Gingerbread Style

First Cognitive Therapy Technique -- Distraction

My therapist said Think of something you might find enjoyable.  You don't have to do it.  You don't even have to enjoy it.  The goal is not to move your mood from 1 to 10.  Any mood change is a bonus.  The goal is simply to give you something else to think about [-- besides what I had been thinking about.]

Distraction is one of those really irritating CBT techniques.  I am traumatized and can't stop thinking about this.  Okay, so think about something else.  I pay money for this?

But my other therapist, totally different method, said pretty much the same thing.  And I was six weeks from a major project I had promised for the holiday season.  And I am not sure it would have worked except that the wheel was ready to turn from early autumn danger to late autumn hypomania.  But he did and it was.  So...

She said think about it.

I guess I overshot the mark.


Ya think?

To Diagnose Hypomania -- Pay Attention

I used to churn out 10-12…

Holiday Survival Tips for Loonies

While I am working on my entry for the Gingerbread Trail contest, here is a repeat from December, 2009.  I have reformatted and modified it slightly for Thanksgiving.  Happy Turkey!


Ah, the holidays!  Time when far flung family members travel home and grow close around the turkey table.  Time to renew friendships in a round of parties and frivolity.  Time to go crazy?

There are stresses this time of year.  Routines are disrupted, people stay in crowded quarters, those who have reason to avoid each other are thrown together, negotiations between exes require professional mediation, alcohol is consumed in greater quantities, expectations for love and good cheer are bound for disappointment.  Loonies and normals alike need to tend to their mental health.

So Prozac Monologues supplies a handy holiday guide, with an assist from NAMI's Peer to Peer class and the University of Iowa Adult Behavioral Health department, covering the basics, planning ahead, mindfulness and quick geta…

Hope and the Play of the Week

I am up to my earlobes in ribbon candy, pretzels and gingerbread right now, a holiday project gone diagnosable.  I have been working for several weeks now on the prototype of a gingerbread house that is yet to come.  If this one stands.

I hope I can post pictures of the finished product.  They could go in my file.

Meanwhile, I have scavenged a video from a Facebook friend.  It reminds me of my very favorite poem in the whole wide world.  My congregations know it by heart, they have heard me preach it so often.

Listen to the mustn'ts, child.  Listen to the don'ts.
Listen to the shouldn'ts, the impossibles, the won'ts.
Listen to the never haves then listen close to me...
Anything can happen, child.
Anything can be.

-- Shel Silverstein
Come to think of it, the gingerbread house, the poem and the play of the week all have this is common.  They are matches, held up against the darkness.


Here's hoping you some light.

Weighing Costs and Benefits Part V -- Down and Dirty Algorithm

SE + NE + $$$ + STG + TR = STC.

E#PT X NSR = STB.

STB TO STC = ODDS OF SUCCESS


There it is, theProzac Monologues Down And Dirty Algorithm, to weigh your costs and benefits for medication or any other treatment for any mental illness, or any other medical condition, for that matter.  Click on the first and second lines.  They will take you to the posts that develop the formula.

Can you believe we finally made it?

We started with the:

Manifesto of a Lab Rat.


I am a Lab Rat.  Yes, I am.

The Manifesto begins there.


It continues:

If I am a lab rat, I will be a free-range lab rat.

What I mean by free-range lab rat is this:

I insist that I contribute more to this enterprise than my body.

Your doctor tells you to weigh your costs and benefits, but gives you no way to do so, other than insufficient information + gut + desperation = noncompliance, if you don't come up with the same answer as your doctor.

What we need is an algorithm: logical rules that we can apply to objective data to so…