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Survival - Three Things Learned From Danny MacAskill

1.  To keep your audience, edit out most of the falls.

2.  To help your audience, keep some of the falls.

3.  Find the Iron Rule and do not break it.  In MacAskill's case -- the front wheel is for steering; you want to land on the back wheel.  In my case -- the frontal cortex is for steering; I will inevitably land on the amygdala.

A repeat from:

Thursday August 26, 2010

Tribute To Survival

This is dedicated to those who are surviving the Chemistry Experiment, and to those who hang in there with us.

Bring your courage and your hope, whatever you can manage.

And your helmet.




Thanks to Danny MacAskill and Band of Horses.

Comments

  1. Please explain #3s, I just don't get it. Why does one want to land on the back wheel, or the amygdala? Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Sorry about that-- when I am not feeling well, I tend to get more cryptic.

    I have watched this video lots and lots, and noticed that if MacAskill lands successfully, it is on his back wheel. I think that's a physics issue, maintaining stability by keeping the weight behind and below the pivot point. He uses the right part of the bike for the right task.

    Regarding the amygdala, it's not about what you WANT. It's about the evolutionary requirement. When confronted with new stimulus, the first question the brain asks is "Am I safe?" That's the amygdala talking. You can override the amygdala's safety needs, using the front part of the brain, which is the part designed for steering. But the circuits start in the amygdala, as reliably as a physics issue.

    ReplyDelete

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