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For When Your Therapist Goes on Vacation

I have two therapists and they were both on vacation the week I got home from my mother's funeral and all those issues and all the family and all those issues.  And still on vacation the week after that!  My brother-in-law subbed - thank you, Darryl - with the following email.  I offer it as a resource for when your therapist picks a lousy time to go on vacation.

For extra entertainment value (my entertainment, anyway), I have identified which one I hear Michael telling me with >>, and which ones I hear Liz telling me with **.  One of them regularly irritates me.  I'll let you guess which one.  I have to keep both, because the double-teaming seems to help.

Wisdom Learned From the Seat of a Tractor


Your fences need to be horse-high, pig tight, and bull-strong.

Keep skunks and bankers at a distance.

**Life is simpler when you plow around the stump.

A bumble bee is considerably faster than a John Deere tractor.

Words that soak into your ears are whispered, not yelled.

Meanness don't just happen overnight.

>>Forgive your enemies; it messes with their heads.

Do not corner something that you know is meaner than you.

**It don't take a very big person to carry a grudge.

You cannot unsay a cruel word.

**Every path has a few puddles.

>>When you wallow with pigs, expect to get dirty.

The best sermons are lived, not preached.

**Most of the stuff people worry about ain't never gonna happen anyway.

Don't judge folks by their relatives.

>>Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.

Live a good and honorable life.  Then when you get older and think back, you'll enjoy it a second time.

**Don't interfere with something that ain't bothering you none.

>>Timing has a lot to do with the outcome of a rain dance.

>>If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging.

Sometimes you get, and sometimes you get got.

**>>The biggest troublemaker you'll probably ever have to deal with watches you from the mirror every morning.

>>Always drink upstream from the herd.

>>Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.

Lettin' the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than putting it back in.

If you get to thinking you're a person of some influence, try ordering somebody else's dog around.

Live simply, love generously, care deeply, speak kindly, and leave the rest to God.

Don't pick a fight with an old man.
If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.

And finally...


That's me, waiting for next week's appointment...

photos ripped from an email.  I have no idea where they came from

Comments

  1. First off, I'm very sorry for your loss.

    That's definitely a rough time to be without therapy. However, it's great to hear that you have family to support you.

    This one was definitely my favorite piece of wisdom:

    If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging.

    Good luck getting through the grieving and healing process, it sounds like you have a good team of people backing you up.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh my God I just love reading your wisdom/wit. Big thumbs up.

    Sorry to hear of your loss. Time & love do heal.

    My favorite one is "The biggest troublemaker you'll probably ever have to deal with watches you from the mirror every morning."

    I am so glad to have been steered this way to read your blog. Bravo! Can't wait to read all your blogs.
    "Justawatchingit"

    ReplyDelete

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