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NAMI Walks for the Mind of America

Saturday, May 8 -- It was COLD!!! and windy.  No upright displays this year.  But there were the usual belly dancers, musicians, dogs, fabulous bagels, cream cheese, fruit, granola bars, cookies...

And volunteers -- serving food, registering walkers, taking photos, cheering us on.  The clown making toy balloons!

And the walkers.  And the strollers.  And the dogs.

Speaking of which:
Here she is, in a rare moment walking the designated path.  Mazie had never been to City Park before.  So many new smells!  So many new trees!  So much marking to do!

After we walked a mile, the short loop, Mazie's back leg began to falter -- the one that has done twice the work of the other two for the last thirteen years.  What with all the zig-zagging between trees, it's likely she did do 5K, and it was just her people who gave out.

Meanwhile, she cooperated magnificently, wearing her own shirt.  As soon as she returned to the start, she got into her therapy dog mode, sitting stock still while little girls with various levels of petting skills mobbed her, countless adults pondered her, and one woman who lives in a group home asked to be photographed with her. -- If her staff person is reading this, we are waiting for your email, so we can send the photo!

There were the requisite speeches from the requisite politicians.  Thank you, Dave Loebsack for doing your part to get mental health parity, more or less, into the health care bill.  Please support the President's interpretation that case management and reimbursement rates for psychiatrists have to match other forms of health care.  -- That issue has cost me thousands, because my care providers won't contract with my stingy health insurance company.

But I had to listen to speeches only from a distance.  They had serious competition.  The Old Capitol City Roller Girls were giving a demonstration in the parking lot.  No, it is not the chaos and brawling that I remember from childhood tv.  It probably wasn't then.  There are rules.  There is a point.  There are fabulous outfits!

This video is a bit long.  But it gives you the idea:



Anyway, as always, a fabulous day.  NAMI Johnson County raised $65,983.99 by walk day, 88% of its goal on the way to $75,000.  Did I mention that it was COLD?!

And Team Prozac Monologues, dressed in layers, but still proudly sporting our t-shirts, has raised $2395 of our $3500 goal so far.

Yes, there still is time to help us reach our goal!  In fact, for a limited time you, too, can receive one of our t-shirts.  They are cotton tagless t's, navy blue, with logos front and back.

The front is a shameless bid to win the t-shirt contest.


while the back says:


-- a shameless bit of self promotion!

Just make a donation of $30 or more or MORE by clicking the link up top on the right.  Then send your size and your address to: wmgoodfe@yahoo.com.  I'll make one up custom for for you!  This offer expires June 25!  So do it today!  Thanks!!

On a more sober note,  Gay and Ciha Funeral and Cremation Service was one of the main sponsors, and got a promo on the official walk t-shirt, while Lensing Funeral & Cremation Service sponsored a kilometer.  Their support reminds me that mental illness is potentially fatal, just like heart disease and breast cancer.  They might sponsor those walks, too.

As a priest I occasionally worked with those who provide funeral services.  I respect these people immensely, as do most clergy I know.  They do things for the bereaved that communities used to do, communities that don't much exist anymore.  Hospice has re-created a way for friends and family to talk with and support one another in the sorrow of many forms of death.  But funeral homes are the ones who step up to the plate for survivors of suicide.  They offer resources and support groups to friends and family.  I appreciate the work that they do.  And I appreciate their support of NAMI, in its work to stomp out the stigma of mental illness.

With them, with you, one step at a time, we shall overcome.

Oh yes, and it was COLD!!?!

Comments

  1. Glad you had a great walk, Willa. Next time, though, pick a warmer locale (such as San Diego). :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a positive post! Thank you for sharing the details of your day. I felt that I was right there with you. We don't have anything similar in Canada that I know of but I might just have to do something about that! Keep up the great work.

    ReplyDelete

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